Guardian newspaper dating site

10-Dec-2015 11:20 by 5 Comments

Guardian newspaper dating site

The paper supported NATO's military intervention in the Kosovo War in 1998-1999.

"The really ludicrous position is that Mr Lloyd George is fighting to enfranchise seven million women and the militants are smashing unoffending people's windows and breaking up benevolent societies' meetings in a desperate effort to prevent him." Scott thought the Suffragettes' "courage and devotion" was "worthy of a better cause and saner leadership".

While Gott denied that he received cash, he admitted he had lunch at the Soviet Embassy and taken benefits from the KGB on overseas visits. In 1995, both the Granada Television programme World In Action and The Guardian were sued for libel by the then cabinet minister Jonathan Aitken, for their allegation that Harrods owner Mohamed Al Fayed had paid for Aitken and his wife to stay at the Hôtel Ritz in Paris, which would have amounted to accepting a bribe on Aitken's part.

Aitken publicly stated that he would fight with "the simple sword of truth and the trusty shield of British fair play".

At the time the paper also supported internment without trial in Northern Ireland: "Internment without trial is hateful, repressive and undemocratic.

In the existing Irish situation, most regrettably, it is also inevitable... To remove the ringleaders, in the hope that the atmosphere might calm down, is a step to which there is no obvious alternative." In 1983 the paper was at the centre of a controversy surrounding documents regarding the stationing of cruise missiles in Britain that were leaked to The Guardian by civil servant Sarah Tisdall.

In the lead-up to the first Gulf War, between 19, The Guardian expressed doubts about military action against Iraq: "Frustration in the Gulf leads temptingly to the invocation of task forces and tactical bombing, but the military option is no option at all.

The emergence yesterday of a potential hostage problem of vast dimensions only emphasised that this is far too complex a crisis for gunboat diplomacy.

Aslam was a member of Hizb ut-Tahrir, an Islamist group, and had published a number of articles on their website.

According to the paper, it did not know that Aslam was a member of Hizb ut-Tahrir when he applied to become a trainee, though several staff members were informed of this once he started at the paper.

Loose talk of 'carpet bombing' Baghdad should be put back in the bottle of theoretical but unacceptable scenarios." But on the eve of the war, the paper rallied to the war cause: "The simple cause, at the end, is just.

An evil regime in Iraq instituted an evil and brutal invasion. Let the momentum, and the resolution, be swift." After the event, journalist Maggie O'Kane conceded that she and her colleagues had been a mouthpiece for war propaganda: "...

Our soldiers and airmen are there, at UN behest, to set that evil to rights. we, the media, were harnessed like 2,000 beach donkeys and led through the sand to see what the British and US military wanted us to see in this nice clean war".